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Technical Tips

Get expert advice from our factory-trained technicians who share a new tech tip every month in the Ground Support e-newsletter.

Kidde Issues Recall of Fire Extinguishers with Plastic Handles

On November 2, 2017, Kidde issued a recall (Recall Number 18-022) of fire extinguishers with plastic handles.

On November 2, 2017, Kidde issued a recall (Recall Number 18-022) of fire extinguishers with plastic handles. The fire extinguishers can become clogged or require excessive force to discharge and can fail to activate during a fire emergency.

This recall affects JLG® part numbers 70010354 (sold individually) and 70010355 (sold by case). Please contact Kidde directly for complete recall details, including how to determine if you have an affected model and information on how to have a new extinguisher sent to you.

View the JLG® Technical Bulletin (144 KB PDF) for details.

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Repair Your Water-damaged Telehandler

Telehandlers that are partially or fully submerged in water can be severely damaged.

Telehandlers that are partially or fully submerged in water can be severely damaged. If you decide to repair your telehandler rather than replace it, it’s important to follow the proper repair and inspection procedures.

Before returning your telehandler to service, you should:

  • Complete the repair and inspection procedures packet
  • Make sure it meets all inspection requirements
  • Correct any discrepancies in machine function
  • Ensure all decals are legible and properly positioned
  • Place the Operator and Safety Manual onboard within designated storage compartment
  • Have it inspected by a JLG-qualified equipment mechanic

Download the JLG Telehandler Severe Water Damage Procedure PDF (66 KB PDF) for more detailed, step-by-step instructions.

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Enhance Your Technical Skills Through Training

A well-trained team is safer and more effective. Service training from JLG provides an understanding of the design, operation and maintenance of JLG® equipment.

A well-trained team is safer and more effective. Enroll in the JLG® Technician Fundamentals course to learn the following:

  • Hydraulic and electrical schematic symbols
  • JLG schematics
  • Hydraulic pressure checks
  • Use of a digital multimeter
  • Use of a JLG analyzer
Service training from JLG provides an understanding of the design, operation and maintenance of JLG® equipment. Explore upcoming classes today by visiting JLG University.

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Brush up on Hearing Protection Best Practices

According to EHS Today, hearing loss is the most common issue that affects workers.

According to EHS Today, hearing loss is the most common issue that affects workers. Fortunately, it’s easily preventable once you identify areas of your worksite with high levels of sound. You can do this by using a sound level meter or a noise dosimeter, but what if one of these tools isn’t available? Try standing a few feet away from a coworker and speaking normally. If you can’t be heard without raising your voice, you can assume that the environment is loud enough to require ear protection.

Brush up on other noise protection best practices with these six tips from EHS Today and this pocket guide from OSHA.

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Don't Get Caught in the Storm

If you are outdoors and hear thunder, you are in danger of lightning. Protect yourself and your team by seeking shelter and waiting for the storm to pass.

If you are outdoors and hear thunder, you are in danger of lightning. Protect yourself and your team by seeking shelter and waiting for the storm to pass. With summer work in full swing, follow these tips from the U.S. Department of Labor:

  • Wait 30 minutes from the last sound of thunder before returning to work.
  • Start your day by reviewing NOAA weather reports to prepare for potential hazards.
  • Know your shelter locations – enclosed buildings with electrical wiring and plumbing.
  • Train your team on lightning safety and encourage them to adhere to safety guidelines.
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Regroup to Prevent Repeat Mistakes

Revisit your safety shortfalls over the last five years and schedule the appropriate training and refresher courses.
Revisit your safety shortfalls over the last five years and schedule the appropriate training and refresher courses. Though you likely addressed the issue shortly after the original incident occurred, your team may now have new members or may have forgotten how important a particular safety precaution can be. Get ahead of a potential recurrence by revisiting any problems with your staff today.
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Preventing Aerial Lift Injuries

The operator of an aerial lift must not accept operating responsibility until they are properly trained.

The operator of an aerial lift must not accept operating responsibility until they are properly trained. Training includes reading and understanding the manufacturer’s operator’s manual as a first step. You can work safer by following protocols before and while using equipment, such as setting outriggers, brakes and wheel chocks, and not exceeding load limits.
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The Importance of Hydration on the Job Site

With summer temperatures spiking across the country, don’t forget to encourage your teams to drink water and other hydrating beverages regularly.
With summer temperatures spiking across the country, don’t forget to encourage your teams to drink water and other hydrating beverages regularly. 

Dehydration can exacerbate the physical challenge of working in high temperatures. Potentially life-threatening in extreme cases, even minor cases of dehydration can disrupt focus and impede performance.
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Spring Clean to Eliminate Trip Hazards

According to OSHA, the majority of workplace accidents stem from slips, trips and falls.
According to OSHA, the majority of workplace accidents stem from slips, trips and falls. This spring, set aside time to clean away the muck and grime from winter and to declutter your workplace. A cleaner job site is easier for your team to navigate!
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Fall Arrest vs. Fall Restraint

Falls are one of the leading causes of injuries in the workplace.
Falls are one of the leading causes of injuries in the workplace. As you work to mitigate the dangers of falls in your facility by putting safeguards in place, keep the differences between arrest and restraint in mind: Fall arrest means to be caught while falling and fall restraint means to be restrained from falling in the first place. 
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Reducing Risks When Working in Extreme Heat

Soaring outdoor temperatures put you and your staff at higher risk for heat related illness, such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

Soaring outdoor temperatures put you and your staff at higher risk for heat related illness, such as heat exhaustion and heat stroke. To help reduce this risk, follow precautions such as these outlined by Ready.gov: Stay indoors as much as possible and limit exposure to the sun, use cooling fans, stay hydrated and wear lightweight and loose fitting clothes. Avoid consuming alcohol, caffeinated drinks and heavy meals. Monitor yourself and coworkers for signs and symptoms of heat related illness.
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Empower Your Employees

To improve the success of your safety efforts, empower employees to identify and report safety concerns instead of relying solely on managers and supervisors to maintain a safe workplace.
To improve the success of your safety efforts, empower employees to identify and report safety concerns instead of relying solely on managers and supervisors to maintain a safe workplace. By making safety a joint, collaborative effort that incorporates your entire team, potential hazards are more likely to be identified and corrected before they cause harm.
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General Safety Precautions

Did you know your Operators & Safety Manual has essential precautions for your JLG® machine?
Did you know your Operators & Safety Manual has essential precautions for your JLG® machine? That’s right, get guidelines for workplace and machine inspection, and learn about dangers and warnings, from trip and fall risks to tipping hazards. Need a copy of your manual? Search here.
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Repair Your Water-damaged Equipment

Mobile elevating work platforms (formally AWPs) that are partially or fully submerged in water can be severely damaged.

Mobile elevating work platforms (formally AWPs) that are partially or fully submerged in water can be severely damaged. If you decide to repair your MEWP rather than replace it, it’s important to follow the proper repair and inspection procedures.

Before returning your MEWP to service, you should:

  • Complete the repair and inspection procedures packet
  • Make sure it meets all inspection requirements
  • Correct any discrepancies in machine function
  • Ensure all decals are legible and properly positioned
  • Place the Operator and Safety Manual onboard within designated storage compartment
  • Have it inspected by a JLG-qualified equipment mechanic

Download the JLG Severe Water Damage Procedure PDF (67 KB PDF) for more detailed, step-by-step instructions.

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Protect Your Team from Heat Stress

Avoiding the dangers of heat stress is a joint effort where everyone involved must do their part to protect themselves and their coworkers.

Avoiding the dangers of heat stress is a joint effort where everyone involved must do their part to protect themselves and their coworkers. One of the best practices for a hot workplace is to make water easily accessible and to encourage frequent rehydration breaks, aiming for one cup of water every 15 to 20 minutes.

Read this infographic from the CDC to learn more about heat stress and how to keep your workers safe in hot, challenging conditions.

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OSHA Training Update for Fall Prevention

Slips and falls have been one of the leading causes of workplace injuries for decades, and OSHA is continuing their efforts to lower these rates.

Slips and falls have been one of the leading causes of workplace injuries for decades, and OSHA is continuing their efforts to lower these rates. In 2016, OSHA updated its walking and working standards as well as its fall protection standards for general industry. By requiring employers to identify and plan for fall hazards, OSHA hopes to use a mix of training and proactive behaviors to make workplaces safer.

To learn more about fall prevention visit EHSToday.

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Safety Begins with Training

Training is about more than optimizing productivity and minimizing downtime.

Training is about more than optimizing productivity and minimizing downtime. Learning from qualified instructors prepares operators to make the right decisions when stakes are high. As you evaluate your own training processes, consider developing a program that includes:

  • Structured instruction that mixes classroom and hands-on learning
  • An in-house certified trainer who oversees ongoing best practices
  • Periodic training refreshers through mobile or remote learning
  • The development and maintenance of a safety-first culture of accountability
With effective training as your backbone, your team can reach peak performance without sacrificing safety.

Enhance your training with JLG courses and tools today.

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Brush up on Fall Arrest Systems

OSHA requires a fall arrest system in a setting where a worker could fall six feet or more. While these standards are well known in the industry, falls still remain one of the most common workplace incidents.

OSHA requires a fall arrest system in a setting where a worker could fall six feet or more. While these standards are well known in the industry, falls still remain one of the most common workplace incidents. To keep yourself and your team safe, review these best practices for preventing falls:

  • Set your fall arrest system to prevent free falls greater than 6 feet while also preventing contact with a lower level.
  • Arresting force should not exceed 1,800 pounds.
  • Always inspect your fall arrest systems for damage, wear or defects before beginning work.
Visit OSHA.gov to read their full guidelines for fall arrest systems.
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New Guide to Electrical Safety

Electrocutions are responsible for thousands of injuries each year.
Electrocutions are responsible for thousands of injuries each year. EHSToday recently shared a comprehensive interactive guide to electrical safety to help you and your team avoid preventable incidents on the job site. Read it today.
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OSHA Issues New Rule for Confined Spaces

Confined spaces have always posed a number of safety concerns for construction workers — including airborne and physical hazards.

Confined spaces have always posed a number of safety concerns for construction workers — including airborne and physical hazards. In an effort to protect more workers, OSHA recently announced a new rule on confined spaces that includes leveraging the potential of new monitoring technology and improving the way employers share information about their job sites. Visit

Safety News Alert for details.
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Preparing for an OSHA Visit

OSHA rarely warns businesses ahead of time about a visit, but that doesn’t mean you can’t be prepared.
OSHA rarely warns businesses ahead of time about a visit, but that doesn’t mean you can’t be prepared. JoAnn Dankert, a senior consultant with the National Safety Council, suggests establishing an inspection response procedure so that your team can handle the inspection efficiently and effectively.
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Worksite Analysis

A worksite analysis is a proactive way to identify and eliminate hazards before an incident occurs.
A worksite analysis is a proactive way to identify and eliminate hazards before an incident occurs. With a structured and organized approach, you can conduct thorough evaluations of your worksite using comprehensive surveys, change analysis, hazard analysis, and safety and health inspections.
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September is Fall Prevention Awareness Month

According to OSHA, falls are the leading cause of death in construction even though they are preventable through proper planning, training and use of protective equipment.

According to OSHA, falls are the leading cause of death in construction even though they are preventable through proper planning, training and use of protective equipment. This month, talk to your teams about fall prevention. Encourage everyone—not just leaders and managers—to take ownership of workplace safety and to think ahead about the safety implications of working from any height. For more information and ideas about how to promote fall prevention in your workplace, visit the OSHA website.
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Electrical Line Hazards

Regularly working at height puts you at risk of coming into contact with electrical lines.
Regularly working at height puts you at risk of coming into contact with electrical lines. To keep you and your team safe, OSHA recommends that you maintain a minimum clearance of at least 10 feet from overhead lines, but that minimum distance should increase as voltage increases (reference the provided chart). When positioning your lift, you should also account for machine movement and the line swaying, and you should always treat all wires as though they are live.

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Daily Workplace Inspections

Establish a culture of safety by charging your team to conduct daily inspections of their workplace or job site to proactively identify potential hazards.
Establish a culture of safety by charging your team to conduct daily inspections of their workplace or job site to proactively identify potential hazards. If your job site changes rapidly, consider making inspections more frequent to increase the likelihood of preventing injuries.
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JLG Industries, Inc. is the world's leading designer, manufacturer and marketer of access equipment. The Company's diverse product portfolio includes leading brands such as JLG® aerial work platforms; JLG, SkyTrak® and Lull® telehandlers; and an array of complementary accessories that increase the versatility and efficiency of these products. JLG is an Oshkosh Corporation Company [NYSE: OSK].
An Oshkosh Corporation Company