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Equipment

Approved or Not: How do You Know When It Comes to Telehandler Attachments

Blog Posts - Apr 19

Approved or Not: How do You Know When It Comes to Telehandler Attachments

JLG Industries, Inc.
World-leading access equipment manufacturer
____
McConnellsburg, PA

Prior to the 1970s, if you saw a set of forks on a job-site they were most likely attached to an industrial or rough terrain forklift. With the invention of the telescopic boom, forklifts quickly evolved into much more versatile material handlers capable of accomplishing numerous tasks previously requiring other pieces of equipment. These new versatile lift trucks quickly became known as telehandlers.

Telehandlers go by many names – telescopic handler, telescopic fork lift, telescopic material handler, shooting boom forklift and teleporter just to name a few. Regardless of what you call it, the role of telehandlers has become essential to completing various tasks on a construction site today. 

Over time, these machines have become superstars of the job-site. The construction equipment equivalents of overachievers you might say. They’re the first to work in the morning and the last to punch out at the end of the day. 

Think about it. Next time you spot a telehandler it could be accomplishing any number of tasks (utilizing approved attachments) such as:

- Unloading a pallet of material like drywall or shingles
- Suspending a roof truss. 
- Transporting wooden or steel beams
- Carrying and dumping loose material like waste or recycling
- Sweeping up around the site
- Drilling holes for posts or poles
- Transporting pipe
- Lifting people

Telehandler dumps a load of dirt
Generally, telehandlers can reach higher areas that forklifts can’t access, extend further than skid steer loaders, and require less training to operate than a crane. In some cases, telehandlers are also a more budget-friendly rental option compared to forklifts or cranes. And they aren’t just limited to construction applications. Now it’s not uncommon to see a telescopic handler grappling pipe, transporting hay bales or loading loose material.

The versatility provided by telehandlers has made them invaluable to many contractors. With a wide array of available attachments, telehandlers can perform countless tasks across many industries. The telehandler can then accomplish some of the duties normally limited to a forklift, mobile elevating work platform (MEWP), tractor, or earth-moving machine.

Once you identify the correct type of attachment for your application, how can you be sure it’s designed to deliver the most productivity from your machine? More importantly, how can you be sure it’s safe for you to use with your specific telehandler? 

Attachments that have not been approved for use with your telehandler could cause damage to the machine or pose a safety risk. For example, an overextended or overloaded telehandler can tip over with little or no warning. Equipment manufacturers spend a numerous amount of time and resources when developing an OEM attachment.

Attachments that have not been approved for use with your telehandler could cause damage to the machine or pose a safety risk.

 

If you choose to use a non-OEM attachment, you are responsible for:

• Design 
• Fabrication
• Workmanship
• Structural Integrity
• Maximum Capacity
• Fit and Function
• Overall Quality
• Any operation and safety instructions specific to the attachment
• The attachment is clearly labeled in accordance with ANSI/ITSDF B56.6
• Ensuring that the attachment and use of the attachment complies with this and all other applicable standards

So how do you know if an attachment is approved or not? Most original equipment manufacturers will publish information to assist you in determining if an attachment is approved for use with your equipment.  If you're operating a JLG Telehandler, you should refer to the machine specific operator's manual. There you will find information to help you determine if the attachment is approved for use with your machine.

 

Here is an example of what you'll see:

1.1 APPROVED ATTACHMENTS

Coupler Mounted Attachments:
To determine if an attachment is approved for use on specific telehandler you are using, perform the following prior to installation.

• The attachment type, weight and dimensions must be equal to or less than the data shown on a capacity chart located in the operator cab.
• The model on the capacity chart must match the model telehandler being used.
• Hydraulically powered attachments must only be used on machines equipped with auxiliary hydraulics.
• Hydraulically powered attachments that require auxiliary electrics must only be used on machines equipped with auxiliary hydraulics and electrics.
• The attachment is clearly labeled in accordance with ANSI/ITSDF B56.6

If any of the above conditions are not met, do not use attachment. Telehandler may not be equipped with proper capacity chart or attachment may not be approved for the model telehandler being used. Contact JLG or a local distributor for further information.


JLG Supplied Fork Mounted Attachments:
To determine if an attachment is approved for use on specific telehandler you are using, perform following prior to installation.

• The machine is authorized for use with JLG supplied fork mounted attachments.
• The model on the capacity chart must match the model telehandler being used.
• Hydraulically powered attachments must only be used on machines equipped with auxiliary hydraulics.
• Hydraulically powered attachments that require auxiliary electrics must only be used on machines equipped with auxiliary hydraulics and electrics.

If any of the above conditions are not met, do not use attachment. Telehandler may not be equipped with proper capacity chart or attachment may not be approved for the model telehandler being used. Contact JLG or a local distributor for further information.

For requirements regarding fork mounted attachments, see “Fork Mounted Attachments” in section 1.3.


Non-OEM Fork Mounted Attachments:
JLG authorizes the use of non-OEM fork mounted attachments provided the criteria and instructions are followed. See “Fork Mounted Attachments” in section 1.3.


 

1.2 UNAPPROVED ATTACHMENTS

Do not use unapproved attachments for the following reasons:

• Range and capacity limitations for “will fit,” homemade, altered, or other non-approved attachments cannot be established.
• An overextended or overloaded telehandler can tip over with little or no warning and cause serious injury or death to the operator and/or those working nearby.
• The ability of a non-approved attachment to perform its intended function safely cannot be assured.

Warning

1.3 FORK MOUNTED ATTACHMENTS 


General Requirements

• Certain fork mounted attachments have a dedicated capacity chart. The attachment type, weight and dimensions must be equal to or less than the data shown on a capacity chart located in the operator cab. If it does not have a dedicated capacity chart, utilize the applicable carriage capacity chart on which the fork mounted attachment is attached.
• Fork mounted attachments are to be used on telehandlers with a standard carriage or side tilt carriage with pallet or lumber forks only.
• All fork mounted attachments must ensure secure connection with pins behind the heel of the forks. Do not secure using chains, straps or clamps directly to the forks, fork carriage, load bar and/or the boom.
• The forks of the carriage must support 2/3 of the load length for any load applied.
• The weight of the fork mounted attachment, rigging and the associated load is to be included in the total load being lifted. Refer to the capacity chart for the carriage in use.
• The capacity chart for the applicable carriage is established with a 24-inch load center, and the load center of the attachment and load must equal 24 inches to utilize the existing load chart capacities.
• When the load center of a combined attachment and/or load exceeds 24 inches, the equivalent load must be calculated to use with the carriage capacity chart. See “Fork Mounted Attachments Equivalent Load” section below.

Note: When lifting loads, ensure that the center of gravity (CG) of the load being lifted is centered (right to left) between the forks.


1.4 EQUIVALENT LOAD

Load Centers Beyond 24 Inches

Carriage and fork capacity charts provided by JLG are validated based on load centers of 24 inches. When the load center for the application being performed exceeds 24 inches, the Equivalent Load must be calculated to use with the carriage capacity chart.

Utilizing Equivalent Load Calculation is applicable for all carriage and fork arrangements. The forks of the JLG carriage must support 2/3 of the load length for any load applied.

Equivalent Load Calculation

The Equivalent Load is determined with the calculation below. The Equivalent Load is the value applied to the respective carriage capacity chart to determine the appropriate use zone(s).

 Equivalent Load Calculation

 

Example

• Weight of load = 5,000 pounds
• Center of gravity of load = 36 inches

The Equivalent Load for this example is:

Example Equivalent Load CalculationThis value is cross-checked to the capacity of the forks to ensure the forks are rated to equally share this load. The user then utilizes the carriage capacity chart to determine where 7,500 lb can be safely moved and placed withing the machine operating limits. 


Fork Mounted Attachments Equivalent Load

The Equivalent Load is determined with the calculation below. The Equivalent Load is the value applied to the respective carriage capacity chart to determine the appropriate use zone(s).

Example Equivalent Load Calculation with Forks

 Example

• Weight of attachment = 500 pounds
• Center of gravity of attachment = 36 inches
• Weight of load = 1,000 pounds
• Center of gravity of load = 45 inches

The Equivalent Load for this example is:

Example Equivalent With Fork Mounted Attachments

This value is cross-checked to the capacity of the forks to ensure the forks are rated to equally share this load. The user then utilizes the carriage capacity chart to determine where 2,625 lb can be safely moved and placed within the machine operating limits.

Calculation Warning for Personnel Work Platforms

 

 

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